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Biden Talks COVID-19, Infrastructure and Economics During Cincinnati Visit; local leaders respond

Economy, infrastructure and the COVID-19 pandemic were among the big issues that President Joe Biden addressed during his visit to Cincinnati on Wednesday. The President’s trip began with a visit to a local union education center to the west of the city. Then he answered questions in a CNN town hall at Mount Saint Joseph University. Many subjects were covered during the town hall, many of which were the Brent Spence Bridge Town Hall on the west side of the town. Biden made a cursory hint at the structure and told town hall visitors it was time to “fix that damn bridge of yours”. Massive infrastructure laws are currently being negotiated. A procedural vote in the Senate failed on Wednesday. But the president says it must be done – and has not minced his mouth. He addressed both local and nationwide issues on topics from infrastructure to COVID-19. One of the biggest problems has been the pandemic – with the main concern being the delta variant and the recent surge in cases. Biden continues the urge to get vaccinated. Delving into the economy, jobs, and recreation of restaurants, he noted that financial packages were being put in place to keep businesses open. He also spoke of bipartisanism to get Republicans to support laws protecting the voting rights of all Americans. Another important issue raised by the President was gun violence. Cincinnati has been no stranger to violence in the past few months, especially the deadly shootout in Smale Park on the weekend of July 4th. The president said it was time to prosecute illegal arms dealers. Spectators included both Republicans and Democrats, as well as a fifth-third shootout survivor, the Urban League CEO and the owner of a popular restaurant group. Of course, not all of their questions could be answered. When asked about the president’s reaction to certain issues, some said they were happy with what they heard, others said the president did not share the same values ​​and they did not support him. “The guy who runs this company, who believes that bipartisan politics is not dead, he was there to pay tribute to his Republican counterparts where he saw fit against your own extremes and your own party, is really important and I was delighted he did that, “said Jackie Congedo, director of the Jewish Community Relations Council.” We disagree with the President are many different things. He’s not for job creation in the private sector. We believe in fewer regulations, nothing more. We think he shouldn’t have canceled the Excel pipeline. We believe he should support the normal men and women who pay taxes, not a huge gigantic government bureaucracy that provides free money. So we have big differences with this president, “said Alex Triantafilou, chairman of the Hamilton County GOP. In front of City Hall, the president stopped at a work facility on the west side. It was a tightly controlled event with t The focus is on working class jobs and infrastructure. It’s a place that falls within the president’s definition of infrastructure. He was taken through the various workplaces and an instructor and apprentice gave him a brief introduction to the wire controls and switches. The president wanted to know more about what People are drawn to jobs like this. The city is using these IBEW electricians to build the largest solar farm in the country. Mayor John Cranley expects the city of Cincinnati to be carbon neutral by the end of this year.

Economy, infrastructure and the COVID-19 pandemic were among the big issues that President Joe Biden addressed during his visit to Cincinnati on Wednesday.

The President’s trip began with a visit to a local union education center to the west of the city.

Then he answered questions in a CNN town hall at Mount Saint Joseph University.

Many subjects were discussed during the town hall, the big one for many being the Brent Spence Bridge.

The president specifically mentioned the Brent Spence Bridge, an issue that plagues the city – and something that many wanted the president to address during the CNN Town Hall on the west side of the city.

Biden made a cursory hint about the structure and told town hall visitors that it was time to “fix your damn bridge.”

Massive infrastructure bills are currently being negotiated.

A procedural vote in the Senate failed on Wednesday. But the president says it must be done – and has not minced his mouth.

He addressed both local and nationwide issues on topics from infrastructure to COVID-19.

One of the biggest problems is the pandemic – with the biggest concern being the delta variant and the recent surge in cases.

Biden continues the urge to get vaccinated.

He discussed the economy, jobs, and recreation of restaurants, and pointed out financial packages that were created to keep businesses open.

He also spoke of bipartisanism to get Republicans to support laws protecting the voting rights of all Americans.

Another important issue raised by the President was gun violence.

Cincinnati has been no stranger to violence in the past few months, especially the deadly shootout in Smale Park on the weekend of July 4th.

The president said it was time to prosecute illegal arms dealers.

Spectators included both Republicans and Democrats, as well as a fifth-third shootout survivor, the Urban League CEO and the owner of a popular restaurant group.

Of course, not all of their questions could be answered.

When asked about the president’s reaction to certain issues, some said they were happy with what they heard, others said the president did not share the same values ​​and they did not support him.

“The guy who runs this company, who believes that bipartisan politics is not dead, he was there to pay tribute to his Republican counterparts where he saw fit against your own extremes and your own party, is really important and I was happy he did that, “said Jackie Congedo, director of the Jewish Community Relations Council.

“What we disagree with the President are many different things. He’s not for job creation in the private sector. We believe in fewer regulations, nothing more. We believe he shouldn’t have canceled the Excel pipeline in support of the normal men and women who pay taxes, not a huge government bureaucracy that provides free money. So we’re very different from this president, “said Alex Triantafilou, chairman of the Hamilton County GOP.

In front of the town hall, the president stopped at a work facility on the west side.

It was a tightly controlled event with an emphasis on working class jobs and infrastructure.

It’s a place that falls within the president’s definition of infrastructure.

He was given a tour of the various workplaces and an instructor and apprentice gave him a brief introduction to the rope controls and switches.

The president wanted to know more about what draws people to jobs like this.

With these IBEW electricians, the city is building the largest solar park in the country.

Mayor John Cranley expects the city of Cincinnati facilities to be carbon neutral by the end of this year.

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