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Picklesburgh, Little Italy Days aim to boost the local economy

It’s a big weekend in the city of Pittsburgh that officials say could help the local economy. Thousands of people are expected at Little Italy Days and tens of thousands are expected in Picklesburgh. Picklesburgh opened along Andy Warhol Bridge in downtown Pittsburgh on Friday. The “goal for all pickles” runs until Sunday. “I work a lot so I don’t come out often and have fun so it’s nice to be able to do that,” said Kari Womack of Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership said the festival became a huge hit, having been named the Best Specialty Food Festival by USA Today for two years in a row. They say this is attracting much-needed crowds to support downtown businesses. “We have hundreds of restaurants and retailers in downtown Pittsburgh that don’t see the daily traffic flow as we see it, so events like this are vital,” said Jeremy Waldrup, President and CEO of the PDP. Vendors like Lina Vetter, who sells Lina bags, say business is of the essence. “We’ve been doing pretty well since we opened at 12 today so it was a steady rush and it started to win a little more after 5,” she said. But this isn’t the only festival in Pittsburgh this weekend. Little Italy Days in Bloomfield hosts more than 200 vendors and also sees the crowds and economic support. Bloomfield lost more than four companies during the pandemic, and this festival, event officials say, is like Christmas for those trying to survive is huge for Bloomfield businesses, “said Sal Richetti, event producer.” They have theirs Workers. They have employees. They have taxes. They have rents. They have inventory. The income they make of it helps them keep business going year round; those who are not vaccinated wear a mask.

It’s a big weekend in the city of Pittsburgh that officials say could help the local economy. Thousands of people are expected at Little Italy Days and tens of thousands are expected at Picklesburgh.

Picklesburgh opened along Andy Warhol Bridge in downtown Pittsburgh on Friday. The “goal for everything pickled” runs until Sunday.

“I work a lot so I don’t come out often and have fun. It’s nice to be able to do that,” said Kari Womack of Pittsburgh.

The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership says the festival became a huge hit and was named Best Specialty Food Festival by USA Today for two years in a row. They say that brings in much-needed crowds to support downtown businesses.

“We have hundreds of restaurants and retailers in downtown Pittsburgh that don’t have as much daily traffic as we do, so events like this are critical,” said Jeremy Waldrup, President and CEO of PDP.

Sellers like Lina Vetter, who sells Lina bags, say business is critical.

“We’re pretty strong since we opened at 12pm today so it was a steady crowd and it started a little more after 5,” she said.

But this isn’t the only festival in Pittsburgh this weekend. Little Italy Days in Bloomfield hosts more than 200 vendors and also sees the crowd and economic support.

Bloomfield lost more than four companies during the pandemic, and this festival, event officials say, is like Christmas for those trying to survive.

“This is huge for the Bloomfield company,” said Sal Richetti, events producer. “You have your labor. They have employees. You have taxes. They have rents. You have inventory.

Regarding the COVID-19 protocols, both festivals require those who are not vaccinated to wear a mask.

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